How To Fix Galaxy S3 Headphone Jack Problem

Written By PhilBlogger on Friday, May 3, 2013 | 3:33 AM



We’ve received a lot of emails asking for a fix to one of the common Galaxy S3 issue; the GS3 headphone jack problem. One of our readers narrated that at random times, his phone fails to project audio through the headphone. According to him, he has to turn the headphone jack several times to get it working.

This problem is becoming more common as Galaxy S3 closes to its first birthday since it was released last year. We tried replicating some of headphone jack problems and we had to borrow two Galaxy S3s from friends who happened to be complaining about the same problem.


Our findings suggest that this problem originates either from the headphone itself or from the headphone jack receptors inside the phone. Here’s what you need to do in case you’re having some problems like this.

Isolating The Problem
  1. Make sure the headphone volume in your Galaxy S3 is turned to an audible level.
  2. Insert your headphone to another device to see if it works. If it’s not working, replace it with a new one.
  3. If available, try inserting different headphones (which you know is working)to your Galaxy S3. If it doesn’t work, it’s the receptor having a problem.
At this point, you would have an idea where the problem is.

Fixing Headphone Jack Receptor Problem

The Galaxy S3 was built with good quality and its receptors couldn’t be damaged that easy. More often, it’s the corrosion that produces this problem. Here’s what you need to do to fix it:
  1. Inspect if there’s something in the hole that’s blocking the headphone jack from establishing good connection with the receptor.
  2. If there is, turn the phone upside down to see if it would fall off. If not, try to find tweezers with long and pointed tip and take out what’s in the hole if you can.
  3. If it’s not possible, find compressed air and give it a blow to see if it would fly out of there.
  4. If none of these steps would work, bring the phone to a tech and tell him your problem.
We tore down one Galaxy S3 to get to the headphone jack receptor and it took us just 7 minutes to do so. Bringing your device to a tech could be your best option here if you can’t get it to work again.

Fixing Headphone Jack Problem

If the problem is in the headphone itself, the fastest way to solve it is to buy a new set. However, if you would want to try to troubleshoot it, here’s what you need to do:
  1. Put small amount of alcohol in a cloth and clean the headphone jack with it.
  2. Once you are sure the jack is clean enough to be able to establish a good connection with the receptor, try inserting it to your Galaxy S3 to see if it works.
  3. If it doesn’t, straighten the cable of the headphone and stretch it gently, if it works then the problem is in the cable. In this case, we would still advise you to buy a new set because sooner or later the problem will happen again and you’ll be annoyed even more if it does.
Do let us know if you still experience problems with the headphone jack in your Galaxy S3. Email us at help@sebertech.com for your questions and problems. Don’t worry, it’s FREE.

9 comments:

  1. The problem, at least with mine is a physical receptor issue, sound can be heard from both ears if you either slightly turn or push on the side of the jack while in the receptor. I do not think cleaning either the jack port or the jack will solve this issue. its a loose connection.

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    1. same problem here and started around same time you wrote. went to samsung desk at best buy. no clue

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  2. I'm on my 3rd s3 phone from having to replace because of a bad receptor. Starting to think I should go ahead and get a different phone if this is going to be a continual issue.

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  3. I'm having the same issue. It is definitely the receptor. I tried 4 different head sets and none of them work. If I use an audio cable to plug the phone into the radios in the kitchen and the car, it works. Those jacks have bigger male ends (I guess size does matter). I think my solution is to have the receptor replaced or find a hands-free set with a bigger jack.

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  4. Might sound stupid, but, having the same issue, i pushed headphones harder into the receptor, they fell a bit deeper, and everything worked.

    Must have been a stiff receptor, headphones still feels tight in it, but all works fine.

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  5. DUDE Thank you so much! Works like a dream now. You're such a tech genie :D

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  6. You get that fixed dude? Exact same issue as you.

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  7. Exact same thing here. Had the same one for almost 2 years and it just started... I'm contemplating buying an complete new audio assembly and replacing it.

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